#ThrowbackThursday: Sherborne Almhouse

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

Sherborne Almshouse from the Don Blair Collection, 1936. Source: University Archives and Special Collection (MSS 247-5185)

Sherborne Almshouse, 1936. Source: University Archives and Special Collection (Don Blair, 247-5185)

In another exciting edition of #ThrowbackThursday, we discuss the Sherborne Almshouse. This photograph is located in the Don Blair collection, taken back on September 7, 1936, in Sherborne, England. The Don Blair collection is available online on http://digitalarchives.usi.edu/digital/ by clicking on “Don Blair collection”.

Sherborne is located in the southwestern part of England, near the English Channel. At one time, Sherborne served as the capital for the Wessex Kingdom. On the estate, there is an abbey and castle is located there; however, the Sherborne Castle has an interesting history. In 1592, Queen Elizabeth I gave Sir Walter Raleigh ownership of the abbey (until she discovered Raleigh married and bore a child with Bess Throckmorton, one of her maids). It was battle site during the English Civil War and numerous kings have visited such as William of Orange and George III. The Digby family presently owns the castle since 1617 (St. Johns’ House, n.d.).

Google Maps showing the location of Sherborne in Southwest England, 2017. Source: Google Maps

Map pin location of Sherborne, England, 2017. Source: Google Maps

The almshouse is still there on the property. Unlike today, almshouses were extremely common from the European colonial era until the 20th Century. They were notable known as “poor houses” and “county homes”: their main residences were “social outcasts” such as “… the mentally ill, the epileptic, the mentally retarded, the blind, the deaf …, the crippled, the tuberculous, and the destitute aged” (Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, n.d.). Today, the almshouse still exists and is a tourist attraction.

References

Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica (n.d.). Almshouse. Retrieved from https://www.britannica.com/topic/almshouse

St. Johns’ House (n.d.). About Sherborne. Retrieved from http://www.stjohnshouse.org/about-sherborne/

Posted in Architecture, European History, history, Throwback Thursday | Leave a comment

Artistic Expression: ISUE Independence Cartoons

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

In the latest edition of “Artistic Expression”, we discuss cartoons; however, they are just any ordinary cartoons. They are cartoons from ISUE (Indiana State University-Evansville) when they fought for independence as a separate university (later becoming USI) in the 1970’s.

ISUE Independence Cartoon: Left to Right: Wright Administration Building with banner, "1974 ISUE Independence" as a man who resembles Zeus holding a thunderbolt labeled, "Senator Phillip Gutman".

ISUE Independence Cartoon, 1974. Source: Creative and Print Services Collection.

The establishment of Indiana State University-Evansville occurred in 1965. It was first located at the Centennial School, on the west side of Evansville, Indiana. In 1969, the first buildings opened serving 1,617 students with eighteen classrooms and seven labs (“USI timeline”, 2015). According to Robert Roeder (n.d.), “To be an independent university, the campus was required to have a library”. In 1971, the new library was opened.

Throughout the 1970’s, the Southern Indiana Higher Education, Inc. (SIHE) board brought up creating student housing at ISUE to the board of trustees at Indiana State University; however, the board rejected it and “people felt the trustees were acting politically and not in the interests of the development of the Evansville campus” (University of Southern Indiana, p. 29).

Independence Cartoon 2

ISUE Independence Cartoon, n.d. Source: Creative and Print Services Collection.

As ISUE continued to grow, “… members of the Indiana House of Representatives and the Indiana Senate, continued to make their colleagues from throughout the state aware of the importance of independence for the young, rapidly-growing institution in Evansville” (University of Southern Indiana, p. 30). Finally, victory was at hand: on April 16, 1985, Indiana Governor and Evansville-native, Robert Orr, signed Senate Bill 206 on campus of newly christened, University of Southern Indiana (University of Southern Indiana, p. 30, 55).

For more information on the history of the University of Southern Indiana, watch Shaping the Future: The University of Southern Indiana documentary or read Shaping the Future, located in the University Archives and Special Collections.

References

Roeder, R. (n.d.). The shaping of a fledgling university. Retrieved from https://www.usi.edu/1965/memories/early-yrs.asp

University of Southern Indiana (2015). Shaping the future. Evansville, Indiana: M.T. Publishing Company, Inc.

USI timeline (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.usi.edu/50/timeline/timeline

Posted in "Artistic Expression", Cartoons, Education, Evansville, Indiana | Leave a comment

#ThrowbackThursday: Gresham Creek Bridge

Gresham Creek Bridge construction on the west pier in New Harmony, Indiana, 1927. Source: Don Blair Collection, MSS 247-4038

Gresham Creek Bridge construction on west pier in New Harmony, Ind., 1927. Source: Don Blair Collection (MSS 247-4038)

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

In our latest edition of #ThrowbackThursday, we discuss the reconstruction of the Gresham Creek Bridge in New Harmony, Indiana was underway on this day in 1927.

In New Harmony’s history, Gresham’s creek served as an important manufacturing center for the city. Before 1927, there is evidence there was a bridge there in 1883 because of correspondence from Edward Travers Cox, who was visiting New Harmony, Indiana. Cox (1939) states, “A saw mill was built by the Harmonists just above the upper bridge on Gresham’s creek, and another on Rush creek…” Along on Gresham’s creek, two mills were constructed and they were used for “…manufacturing oil from flax, hemp, rape and poppy seeds” (Cox, 1939).

Gresham Creek bridge construction with men working on west pier in New Harmony, Indiana, 1927. Source: Don Blair Collection (MSS 247-4045)

Gresham Creek bridge construction with men working on west pier in New Harmony, Ind., 1927. Source: Don Blair Collection (MSS 247-4045)

These photographs were taken by and a part of the Don Blair’s collection. More images from the Don Blair collection is available on digitalarchives.usi.edu/digital. On the homepage, click on “Don Blair collection”, and there are over 2,000 photographs available for viewing.

References

Cox, E. T. (1939). A visit to New Harmony in 1883: Letter of Edward Travers Cox. Indiana Magazine of History, 35 (2), 182-187. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/imh/article/view/7139/7991

Posted in Indiana, New Harmony, Pictures, Throwback Thursday | Leave a comment

Artistic Expression: Krishna

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant at the University Archives and Special Collections.

Palace of Gold festival at New Vrindaban in Moundsville, West Virginia, c. 1985. Source: Robert Rosenthal (CS 665-6789)

Palace of Gold festival at New Vrindaban in Moundsville, West Virginia, c. 1985. Source: Robert Rosenthal (CS 665-6789)

Today, we are starting a new blog series, “Artistic Expression”. Over the next few weeks, you will see various types of artwork from different parts of the United States and local artists from Evansville. A large amount of the artwork that will be discussed is located here at the University Archives and Special Collections. Our first piece is from the Hindu community group in New Vrindaban: they are located in Moundsville, West Virginia.

Founded in 1968, New Vrindaban “… is the oldest and largest Hare Krishna farm community in the West …” sitting on three thousand acres (Fellowship for Intentional Community, 2007). It began as a dream for Srila Prabhupada: he wanted to recreate the community from India “… based on Krishna Consciousness, or love of God” (New Vrindaban’s history, 2016). If you are interested in visiting New Vrindaban, they are open to the public.

Devotee art of Krishna, c. 1980 at New Vrindaban, West Virginia. Source: Robert Rosenthal (CS 665-1202)

Devotee art of Krishna at New Vrindaban in Moundsville, West Virginia, c. 1980. Source: Robert Rosenthal (CS 665-1202)

The image, located on the right, is of Krishna: one of the gods in Hinduism. Krishna is the eighth incarnation of Vishnu, whom is the supreme god. The story of Krishna is located in Mahabharata, a fifth century epic. Krishna is one of the most popular Hindu deities and numerous societies have focused on his deity. Krishna has a fascinating story: as a young child, he was impish but performed miracles and fought demons. Krishna established his court in Dwarka, Gujarat; moreover, he married a princess, Rukmini. He refused to get involved in a war between rivaling factions but a huntsman later accidently killed Krishna. Why? The huntsman thought he was a deer and shot Krishna in his weak spot, his heel (Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, n.d.).

If you are interested in seeing more photographs of Hindu art or of New Vrindaban, check out digitalarchives.usi.edu and search “New Vrindaban”.

References

Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica (n.d.). Krishna. Retrieved from https://www.britannica.com/topic/Krishna-Hindu-deity

Fellowship for Intentional Community (2007). Communities directory: A comprehensive guide to intentional communities and cooperative living. Rutledge, MO. Fellowship for Intentional Community.

New Vrinaban (2016). New Vrinaban’s history. Retrieved from http://www.newvrindaban.com/new-vrindabans-history/

Posted in "Artistic Expression", art collections, Communal Studies, Religion | Leave a comment

Meet the Staff: Marilyn Thielman

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

As I mentioned in our last blog post, “Welcome Home, Screagles”, I briefly discussed the Center of Communal Studies relocated to the University Archives and Special Collections this past summer. I am proud to introduce the administrative assistant of the Center for Communal Studies, Marilyn Thielman. Here is some fun facts about Marilyn:

Administrative Assistant, Marilyn Thielman, of the Center for Communal Studies, 2017. Source: James Wethington

Administrative Assistant, Marilyn Thielman, of the Center for Communal Studies, 2017. Source: James Wethington

JW: Marilyn, how long have you worked at the Center?

MT: It will be ten years this December.

JW: Are you originally from the Evansville area?

MT: Yes, I am. I was born and raised here in Evansville. When I was six, my family and I moved to Grand Prairie, Texas but we eventually moved back to Evansville when I was twelve.

JW: What do you find interesting about intentional communities?

MT: It has to be their devotion and service to their members as well as to their respective communities.

JW: Before you came to the Center, did you work as an administrative assistant in other places?

MT: Yes I did. Back then, I was the secretary for economic development for the Metropolitan Evansville Chamber of Commerce for sixteen years. Today, they are now the Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana.

JW: That sounds like a lot of fun! Do you have any “fun facts” about yourself for our readers?

MT: I do not know if these are interesting but when I lived in Texas, I played has a pitcher for the boys’ team. I have been married for forty-six years to my husband and we have a son and daughter with four grandchildren, two grandsons and two granddaughters. In 1969, I traveled to seven countries in Europe for fun.

JW: Oh, wow! That is extremely interesting! Thank you Marilyn for taking a moment out of your day to talk with me.

MT: Thank you James. I look forward to helping the USI community if they are interested in learning about communal studies.

If you are interested about learning about communal studies, stop by University Archives and Special Collection, located on the 3rd floor of the David L. Rice Library, from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM, Monday through Friday. For more information, view at the Center for Communal Studies’ webpage for more information.

Posted in Communal Studies, Meet the Staff, Rice Library | 1 Comment