Arch Madness 2018: “Meet Ya” Guide to the Championship

*Post written by James Wethington, library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

*Item descriptions written by Jennifer Greene, university archivist of University Archives and Special Collections, and Susan Sauls, art collection registrar.

On March 12, we started with sixteen artifacts competing for the title of “coolest artifact of 2018”. Now, we are down to our final two entries! Voting begins on April 2 and will end on April 8, at 11:59 PM CST. The final results will be announced on Monday, April 9, at 9:00 AM CST. Stay tuned for more and go vote.

We are down to our final two artifacts: the 1603 Book of Alchemy, from Special Collections, defeated the Game of Community, from Communal Studies, 114-52. On the other side of the bracket, the Incantation Bowl, from the Lawrence Library, defeated the "Beethoven" print, from the USI Art Collection, 114-52.

Final two bracket for Arch Madness 2018!

Special Collections

Works of Paracelsus, 1603. Credit: James Wethington

Works of Paracelsus, 1603. Credit: James Wethington.

Final score against The Game of Community, 114-52.

*Defending 2017 Arch Madness Champion.

The Collected Works of Paracelsus is a rare book in our Special Collections.  Printed in 1603, this two-volume set contains the books and writings on alchemy, magic, and occult philosophies of Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, better known as Paracelsus.

Lawrence Library

Incantation bowl, c. 6th to 8th Century. This item is located in the College of Liberal Arts in Lawrence Library.

Incantation bowl, c. 6th to 8th Century.

Final score against the “Beethoven” print, 114-52.

The incantation bowl, which goes by many names such as a demon bowl or a magic bowl, was usually buried face down in a home’s courtyard or near cemeteries in order to capture demons or evil spirits. Once retrieved, a hole would be made in the bowl to release the spirits.

 

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