“Girls Don’t Do That…”

*Post written by Mona Meyer, Archives and Special Collections Metadata Librarian.

Anna Helena Cluthe didn’t subscribe to that way of thinking. Her father, William (1847-1937) was born in Wabern, Germany, where he studied for the priesthood.  He decided on a different path and became a chemist, then went to Paris and later sailed for New York at the age of 20. He graduated from Ohio Medical College in 1875 and opened a drugstore in Cincinnati. He moved to Tell City, IN and practiced medicine there from 1880 until 1911.

Anna’s older brother, Charles F. (1869-1935) was also a graduate of Ohio Medical College and practiced medicine for 40 years. Her younger brother, Walter J. (1882-1937) graduated from the medical school at the University of Louisville in 1903 and was a doctor in Kansas City, MO and Tell City, IN. Yet another brother, Edward C. (1879-1960), although not a doctor, was in a related field—he operated a local salt pool until it dried up in 1937. Salt pools were beneficial to health and well as being fun for recreation.

Cluthe family in their living room in Tell City. Standing in back, from left: Hulda Illing Cluthe, Dr. Charles F. Cluthe, Edward C. Cluthe, Laura Rahm Cluthe. Sitting, from left: Grandmother Cluthe holding Helen, Anna Helena Cluthe with Oramay Cluthe in front, Grandfather Cluthe holding William August Cluthe, Walter J. Cluthe. Grandfather Cluthe would be Dr. William Cluthe and Grandmother would be Lena Cluthe. Source: Oramay Cluthe-Eades collection, MSS 091-043.

Cluthe family in their living room in Tell City. Standing in back, from left: Hulda Illing Cluthe, Dr. Charles F. Cluthe, Edward C. Cluthe, Laura Rahm Cluthe. Sitting, from left: Grandmother Cluthe holding Helen, Anna Helena Cluthe with Oramay Cluthe in front, Grandfather Cluthe holding William August Cluthe, Walter J. Cluthe. Grandfather Cluthe would be Dr. William Cluthe and Grandmother would be Lena Cluthe. Source: Oramay Cluthe-Eades collection, MSS 091-043.

Clearly medicine was in Anna’s blood, and she wanted to follow in her father’s and brothers’ footsteps. Her family, however, had different ideas—they believed the life of a horse-and-buggy doctor was too rigorous for a girl. Nor was being a doctor “ladylike.”  A compromise was reached—Anna could study to be either a pharmacologist or a dentist.  But Anna had a bit of rebellion in her blood—while she seemingly agreed to the compromise, she pursued medical training for 2 years until her family found out and stopped her allowance. She then shifted to dentistry, graduating from Indiana Dental College in 1904.

Anna Cluthe’s graduation from Indiana Dental College, 1904. Source: Oramay Cluthe-Eades collection, MSS 091-035.

Anna Cluthe’s graduation from Indiana Dental College, 1904. Source: Oramay Cluthe-Eades collection, MSS 091-035.

Dr. Anna Cluthe was the first woman dentist in Evansville, practicing from 1904-1960, retiring only when her eyesight was no longer good enough to do this work. She saw a lot of changes in her life time. Before it was commonly accepted, she advocated a good diet/less sugar for preventative care. Her alma mater, Indiana Dental College, which was founded in 1879, was acquired by Indiana University in 1925, becoming today’s Indiana University School of Dentistry.

In 1895, the 1st dental X-ray of a living person was taken. In 1903, Charles Land developed the 1st porcelain jacket crown. A German chemist named Alfred Einhorn developed the 1st local anesthetic, called procain—this became novocaine. Nylon toothbrushes came into being in 1938.  The earliest adoption of water fluoridation, only in a few cities, began 1945, with fluoride toothpaste following in 1950.  1958 saw the first fully reclining dental chair. The Evansville Museum of Arts, History & Science has a section called Rivertown, USA, which provides a slice of life in Evansville/the Midwest in the 19th and 20th centuries. One of these exhibits there is a dental office, furnished with Dr. Anna Cluthe’s dental equipment (seen on right).

Anna Cluthe wasn’t the only woman in her family to be an entrepreneur. Her niece (daughter of Anna’s brother, Charles F.) was Oramay Cluthe Eades (1895-1987). Oramay graduated from Combs Broad Street Conservatory of Music in Philadelphia (founded in 1885, since 1923 the Combs College of Music, closed in 1990). She studied harp and piano, and upon graduation in 1918, joined the faculty.

MSS 091-036

Dr. Anna Cluthe, n.d., c. 1913-1933. Source: Oramay Cluthe-Eades collection, MSS 091-036.

In 1924, she returned to Evansville and opened Cluthe Studios, later the Cluthe School of Music. It started with piano only, but in 1931-1932 voice and violin lessons were also offered. It continued to grow, with the addition of pre-school classes, dancing for children, cello, and music theory, until it became a full school of music. At the time, it was one of the largest private music schools in Evansville.

2. UE Music

University of Evansville Department of Music Seal, n.d. Source: https://www.facebook.com/music.evansville.edu/

The school was located at 1133 Lincoln Avenue, relatively close to what was then Evansville College (now the University of Evansville). “The Cluthe school was for all ages, from the beginner to the advanced.  When the school became affiliated with Evansville College in 1940, the advanced students went to the college and the younger ones remained at Cluthe Hall, which became known as EC Preparatory School of Music. The Cluthe School was donated to EC by Mrs. Eades [Oramay Cluthe Eades] when she retired in August 1942. She gave furniture and music to the college outright.  The 200 students enrolled were transferred to EC. The college had only to buy the building on Lincoln Avenue, and for half the going rate. The sign there then read “Evansville College–Cluthe School of Music.” When the new EC Fine Arts Building was completed in 1962, the prep school moved on campus. The college then sold the building at 1133 Lincoln and the Cluthe name was no longer used” (Jeffries, p. 21).

Dr. Charles F. Cluthe, his wife, Hulda Illing Cluthe, daughter Oramay, and son, William, c. 1900. Source: Oramay Cluthe-Eades collection, MSS 091-020.

Dr. Charles F. Cluthe, his wife, Hulda Illing Cluthe, daughter Oramay, and son, William, c. 1900. Source: Oramay Cluthe-Eades collection, MSS 091-020.

Clearly, girls DO do that!

Resources Consulted:

American Dental Association.  History of Dentistry Timeline.

Browning Genealogy/Obituary Index online

Find a Grave online

Indiana University School of Dentistry—About Us—Background.

Jeffries, Phil.  “EC Music School was Gift—Including 200 Students.” The Sunday Look, October 30, 1966, p. 21.  (in MSS 091-1-3)

MSS 091 (Oramay Cluthe-Eades collection), in University Archives/Special Collections

Posted in Evansville, Indiana, Local history, women's history | Leave a comment

2019 Arch Madness Champion Revealed!

*Post written by James Wethington, senior library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

Another a month of voting, a winner as been decided! After 2,800 votes were casted in four weeks, this year’s winner is … Lord Byron’s Dueling Pistols from the Evansville Museum. The dueling pistols defeated the Cook Brewery Beer Bottles, 204-90. The pistols were received an automatic bid into next year’s competition.

Lord Bryon's Dueling Pistols, c. 1809.

Lord Bryon’s Dueling Pistols, c. 1809. Source: Evansville Museum of Arts, History, and Science.

Thank you to everyone who voted over the last four weeks and we hope you enjoyed this year’s competition. We look forward to having you all vote again next year. Until next time!

Brackets (Final Results)

Congratulations to the Evansville Museum for winning this year’s competition!

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Arch Madness 2019: “Meet-Ya” Guide to the Championship

*Post written by James Wethington, senior library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

*Item descriptions written by Mona Meyer, archives and special collections metadata librarian and Tom Lonnberg, curator of history at the Evansville Museum.

And then, there was only two artifacts! After a tight battle in the Final 4, the championship round is here! You can vote online at amusingartifacts.org or in-person at Rice Library 3021. The championship round voting begins April 1 until April 7 at 11:59 PM CST. The winner will be announced on April 8!

In the Arch Madness championship round, we have the Cook Brewery Beer Bottles (from UASC) facing off against the Evansville Museum's Lord Byron's Dueling Pistols.

UASC

Cook Brewery Beer Bottles, n.d.

Cook Brewery Beer Bottles, n.d.

A city with a strong German heritage, Evansville once had as many as seven breweries. One of the largest was F.W. Brewing Company. The company began in 1853 as a partnership between Fredrick Washington Cook and Louis Reis. Cook became the sole owner in 1873 and the company was incorporated as F.W. Brewing Company in 1885. With small name changes, it was in business until the mid-1950’s. Goldblume Beer, which they advertised as “The Best Beer in the World” was one of their signature brews. Note that one of these bottles still contains some beer!

*Defeated “Nacho the Defender”, 177-148.

 

 

Evansville Museum of Arts, History, & Science

Lord Bryon's Dueling Pistols, c. 1809.

Lord Bryon’s Dueling Pistols, c. 1809.

These pistols were made for the famous English poet and politician Lord George Gordon Byron, 1788-1824. Among Byron’s best-known works are Don Juan and Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage. Lord Byron had several controversial relationships before he married Annabella Milbanke in 1815 who left him a year later because of his infidelity. The pistols are engraved with Lord Bryon’s coronet and a “B” and were crafted by H.W. Mortimer and Company of London circa 1809. These dueling pistols are gifts of Harry D. Oppenheimer.

*Defeated 1st West Side Fall Festival Program, 246-88.

Posted in British History, Indiana history, Local history, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Arch Madness 2019: “Meet-Ya” Guide to the Final 4

*Post written by James Wethington, senior library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

*Item descriptions written by Mona Meyer, archives and special collections metadata librarian, Susan Sauls, director of the art collection, Tom Lonnberg, curator of history at the Evansville Museum, and Pat Sides, archivist of Willard Library.

The crowds are going crazy! Pure pandemonium! Arch Madness is back and we have some stiff competition. The University Archives and Special Collections (UASC) is competing against the Lawrence Library, Evansville Museum of Arts, History, & Science, and Willard Library. You can vote online at amusingartifacts.org or in-person at Rice Library 3021. The Final 4 voting begins March 25 until March 31 at 11:59 PM CST.

Final 4 begins March 25 till March 31.

University Archives and Special Collections (UASC)

Cook Brewery Beer Bottles, n.d.

Cook Brewery Beer Bottles, n.d.

A city with a strong German heritage, Evansville once had as many as seven breweries. One of the largest was F.W. Brewing Company. The company began in 1853 as a partnership between Fredrick Washington Cook and Louis Reis. Cook became the sole owner in 1873 and the company was incorporated as F.W. Brewing Company in 1885. With small name changes, it was in business until the mid-1950’s. Goldblume Beer, which they advertised as “The Best Beer in the World” was one of their signature brews. Note that one of these bottles still contains some beer!

*Defeated Sugar Babies Poster, 94-92.

 

Lawrence Library

Nacho the Defender, 2017.

Nacho the Defender, 2017.

Nacho the Defender, a toddler sized figure, is a part of the greater installation piece “Child’s Play” by Matt Perez. Nacho’s role within the work is to defend the pillow fort from other attacking toddlers. This figure belongs to the University Art Collection, Efroymson Fellow Collection.

*Defeated Incantation Bowl, 99-87.

 

 

 

 

 

Evansville Museum of Arts, History, & Science

Lord Bryon's Dueling Pistols, c. 1809.

Lord Bryon’s Dueling Pistols, c. 1809.

These pistols were made for the famous English poet and politician Lord George Gordon Byron, 1788-1824. Among Byron’s best-known works are Don Juan and Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage. Lord Byron had several controversial relationships before he married Annabella Milbanke in 1815 who left him a year later because of his infidelity. The pistols are engraved with Lord Bryon’s coronet and a “B” and were crafted by H.W. Mortimer and Company of London circa 1809. These dueling pistols are gifts of Harry D. Oppenheimer.

*Defeated Ray-Finned Fish Fossil, 122-65.

 

Willard Library

Official Program of the West Side First Annual Fall Festival, 1914.

Official Program of the West Side First Annual Fall Festival, 1914.

Sponsored by the West Side Business Association, the current West Side Nut Club began in 1921, but prior to that, three “Halloween type festivals” were held. The purpose of the festivals was “to initiate, promote, and support any and all movements which are for the betterment of the West Side of Evansville as a whole…”.  

*Defeated La Fendrich Cigar Box and Tin, 107-78.

Posted in British History, Business, history, Indiana history, Local history | Leave a comment

Arch Madness 2019: “Meet-Ya” Guide to the Elite 8

*Post written by James Wethington, senior library assistant of the University Archives and Special Collections.

*Item descriptions written by Mona Meyer, archives and special collections metadata librarian, Susan Sauls, director of the art collection, Tom Lonnberg, curator of history at the Evansville Museum, and Pat Sides, archivist of Willard Library.

The crowds are going crazy! Pure pandemonium! Arch Madness is back and we have some stiff competition. The University Archives and Special Collections (UASC) is competing against the Lawrence Library, Evansville Museum of Arts, History, & Science, and Willard Library. You can vote online at amusingartifacts.org or in-person at Rice Library 3021. Voting begins on March 11 through April 7, 2019.

Elite 8 round begins March 18 till the 24th.

Let’s look at our eight competitors!

University Archives and Special Collections (UASC)

Sugar Babies Poster, n.d.

Sugar Babies Poster, n.d.

The word burlesque roughly means to make fun of, to mock, to joke. This element remained, but later burlesque shows became huge extravaganza variety shows. As time went on, they became more and more bawdy, and by the 1930s, they were striptease shows. Sugar Babies was a Broadway musical that paid tribute to the extravaganza style of burlesque. It debuted in October 1979 and originally starred Mickey Rooney and Ann Miller. A road company with Eddie Bracken, Jaye P. Morgan, and Toni Kaye came to Evansville on February 25, 1982 and performed at Vanderburgh Auditorium.

*Defeated the wool bathing suit, 80-73.

 

Cook Brewery Beer Bottles, n.d.

Cook Brewery Beer Bottles, n.d.

A city with a strong German heritage, Evansville once had as many as seven breweries. One of the largest was F.W. Brewing Company. The company began in 1853 as a partnership between Fredrick Washington Cook and Louis Reis. Cook became the sole owner in 1873 and the company was incorporated as F.W. Brewing Company in 1885. With small name changes, it was in business until the mid-1950’s. Goldblume Beer, which they advertised as “The Best Beer in the World” was one of their signature brews. Note that one of these bottles still contains some beer!

*Defeated ISUE letter jacket, 113-44.

 

 

Lawrence Library

The incantation bowl, which goes by many names such as a demon bowl or a magic bowl, was usually

Incantation bowl, c. 6th to 8th Century.

Incantation bowl, c. 6th to 8th Century.

buried face down in a home’s courtyard or near cemeteries to capture demons or evil spirits. Once retrieved, a hole would be made in the bowl to release the spirits. This bowl belongs to the collection of Michael K. Aakhus.

*Defeated the Annie Oakley print, 82-71.

*Defending 2018 Arch Madness champion

 

 

Nacho the Defender, 2017.

Nacho the Defender, 2017.

Nacho the Defender, a toddler sized figure, is a part of the greater installation piece “Child’s Play” by Matt Perez. Nacho’s role within the work is to defend the pillow fort from other attacking toddlers. This figure belongs to the University Art Collection, Efroymson Fellow Collection.

*Defeated 15th century French psalter, 83-73.

 

 

 

 

 

Evansville Museum of Arts, History, & Science

Ray-Finned Fish (Diplomystus dentatus), n.d.

Ray-Finned Fish (Diplomystus dentatus), n.d.

This fossil fish from the Green River Formation can be dated to around 40 million years ago when a tropical sea was present over what is now Wyoming. The boney fish is a primitive relative of a modern-day herring. The fossil record preserved within the Green River Formation is world-renowned for its quality fossil preservation. This fossil is a gift of Charles LaFollette.

*Defeated the glass vase sculpture, 97-51.

 

Lord Bryon's Dueling Pistols, c. 1809.

Lord Bryon’s Dueling Pistols, c. 1809.

These pistols were made for the famous English poet and politician Lord George Gordon Byron, 1788-1824. Among Byron’s best-known works are Don Juan and Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage. Lord Byron had several controversial relationships before he married Annabella Milbanke in 1815 who left him a year later because of his infidelity. The pistols are engraved with Lord Bryon’s coronet and a “B” and were crafted by H.W. Mortimer and Company of London circa 1809. These dueling pistols are gifts of Harry D. Oppenheimer.

*Defeated O’Dell No. 4 Typewriter, 108-56.

Willard Library

Fendrich Cigar & Box Tin, n.d.

Fendrich Cigar & Box Tin, n.d.

The company opened as Fendrich Brothers Cigar Company on Main Street in 1855, after moving Evansville from Pennsyvlania. (The brothers were Francis, Charles, John, Joseph, and Herman.) The Main Street factory was destroyed by fire in 1910, and a new one was built at Pennsylvania and Oakley, opening in 1912. A local newspaper claimed it was the largest cigar factory “in the world”, and Fendrich was one of Evansville’s largest industries. The company closed in 1969 and moved back in Pennsylvania.

*Defeated the City of Evansville Charter Book, 87-67.

Official Program of the West Side First Annual Fall Festival, 1914.

Official Program of the West Side First Annual Fall Festival, 1914.

Sponsored by the West Side Business Association, the current West Side Nut Club began in 1921, but prior to that, three “Halloween type festivals” were held. The purpose of the festivals was “to initiate, promote, and support any and all movements which are for the betterment of the West Side of Evansville as a whole…”.

*Defeated the Evansville Public School Ledger, 97-60.

 

Posted in American history, Arch Madness, European History, history, Indiana history, Local history | Leave a comment