Arch Madness 2020: Championship Round

Welcome to the Championship Round! If you need to see the artifact descriptions, go the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

*Reminder: The Championship poll close on April 12 at 11:59 PM CST.*

Brackets (Championship)

*For artifact descriptions, go to the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“, for more information on the final two artifacts.
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Arch Madness: Final 4 Polls

Welcome to the Final 4! If you need to see the artifact descriptions, go the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

*Reminder: The Final 4 polls close on April 5 at 11:59 PM CST.*

Brackets (Final 4)

*For artifact descriptions, go to the North and South Region section in the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

*For artifact descriptions, go to the East and West Region section in the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

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Arch Madness: Elite 8 Polls

Welcome to the Elite 8! If you need to see the artifact descriptions, go the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

*Reminder: The Elite 8 polls close on March 29 at 11:59 PM CST.*

Brackets (Elite 8)

*For artifact descriptions, go to the North Region section in the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

*For artifact descriptions, go to the South Region section in the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

*For artifact descriptions, go to the East Region section in the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

*For artifact descriptions, go to the West Region section in the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

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Arch Madness 2020: Sweet 16 Polls

Welcome to Sweet 16! If you need to see the artifact descriptions, go the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

Brackets for Sweet 16 tournament, n.d.

*For artifact descriptions, go to the North Region section in the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

*For artifact descriptions, go to the South Region section in the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

*For artifact descriptions, go to the East Region section in the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

*For artifact descriptions, go to the West Region section in the blog post, “Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Artifacts“.

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Arch Madness 2020: Meet the Competing Institutions

*Post written by Mona Meyer, Archives and Special Collections Metadata Librarian.

University Archives and Special Collections

3rd floor of the David L. Rice Library

UASC Logo, n.d.

In the summer of 1972 the Lilly Endowment, Inc. of Indianapolis, Indiana awarded the then Indiana State University-Evansville a three-year grant to establish an archival project for the acquisition, preservation and processing of regional material. At the end of the third year, the University was to assume responsibility for continuing the growth of the Special Collections.  It started with just a few regional history books on Indiana from the library’s own collection. Today, the University Archives and Special Collection has over 850 unique collections, 800 oral history interviews, 6,500 rare and unique books, and 30,000 digital resources.

Newburgh Museum

503 State Street, Newburgh, Indiana, 47630

Newburgh Museum

The Newburgh Museum preserves exhibits and educates all visitors about the history and culture of Newburgh and the surrounding areas’ unique river town heritage. The permanent displays at the museum include information about the town’s founding, how it got its name, its early industry, a period of decline and how it has changed in modern times. The main exhibit at the museum is changed every few months.

Evansville Museum of Arts, History, and Science

411 SE Riverside Drive, Evansville, Indiana, 47713

Evansville Museum of Arts, History, and Science, n.d.

Evansville has had a museum since 1906, with today’s location dating to the 1950’s.  This appearance dates to a major update and remodel circa 2014. “The Evansville Museum of Arts, History & Science houses a permanent collection of more than 30,000 objects, including fine and decorative art, as well as historic, anthropological, and natural history artifacts. Over twenty temporary, regional and international exhibitions are displayed each year in four galleries. The Koch Immersive Theater houses a 40-foot diameter domed screen with 360-degree digital projection featuring astronomy and science programming. Evansville Museum Transportation Center (EMTRAC) featuring transportation artifacts from the late 19th through the mid-20th centuries. On exhibit is a three-car train. The museum is home to a model train diorama of Evansville.

John M. Lawrence ’73 Library

Room 0119 of the Liberal Arts Center

Lawrence Library, n.d.

The Lawrence Library is located on the lower level in room 0119 of the Liberal Arts Center of USI’s campus. The concept for this library sprang from the friendship of Patricia (Patty) Aakhus and John M. Lawrence. The library is named for Mr. Lawrence, a graduate of USI’s class of 1973 and an international expert and collector of medieval manuscripts, for his generous support of the College of Liberal Arts. John Lawrence donated many items to the College, including a collection of medieval manuscripts as well as other artifacts, for use as a study collection for students. Patty Aakhus was an associate professor of English and served as the director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies and program director in International Studies. Aakhus also published three novels based on medieval texts that she studied and translated. Patricia Aakhus served as the first caretaker of the space prior to her death in 2012. The Lawrence Library prides itself on the student leadership of the space where student archivists curate exhibitions, research manuscripts and artifacts, and participate in collections management and care.

John James Audubon Museum in John James Audubon State Park

3100 US Hwy 41 North, Henderson, Kentucky, 42419

John James Audubon Museum, n.d.

The museum interprets the lives and work of John James Audubon and his family within a timeline of world events. Three galleries chronicle the Audubon story, including the family’s 1810-1819 residency in Henderson, Kentucky. Over 200 objects are on display, including artifacts from Audubon’s Kentucky years, a complete set of his masterwork, The Birds of America, and many original artworks.

USI Archaeology Lab in World Languages and Cultures Department

Liberal Arts Center, Room 3071

USI Archaeology Lab in College of Liberal Arts, n.d.

The faculty of the department of World Languages and Cultures is committed to providing students with language skills and cultural knowledge for professional and academic careers in the 21st century. We foster and strengthen communication among widely diverse constituencies at home and abroad through outreach programs, sustained partnerships and international study. As language-sensitive and language-functional citizens, we foster respect for others.

University of Evansville

University Archives in Bower-Suhrheinrich Library/Clifford Library

1600 Lincoln Avenue, Evansville, Indiana, 47722

University of Evansville Logo, n.d.

University Archives is the repository for archival records pertaining to the history and operations of the University of Evansville.

Working Men’s Institute

407 Tavern Street, New Harmony, Indiana, 47631

Working Men's Institute Logo, n.d.

Established by philanthropist William Maclure in 1838, the Working Men’s Institute (WMI) set as its mission the dissemination of useful knowledge to those who work with their hands. After 170 years of continuous service, this goal is still at the heart of our mission. Maclure, who was a business partner with Robert Owen in the communal experiment in New Harmony from 1825-1827, was devoted to the ideal of education for the common man as a means of positive change in society. At New Harmony, The Working Men’s Institute was one manifestation of this ideal. The Working Men’s Institute in New Harmony was the first of 144 WMIs in Indiana and 16 in Illinois. It is the only one remaining. Many WMIs were absorbed by township libraries or Carnegie libraries. Yet the one in New Harmony remained. Today, the WMI is a public library, a museum and an archive. In each of these areas, the WMI tries to stay true to the original mission of William Maclure.

 

 

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