ArchivesFest Spotlight: Working Men’s Institute, Lincoln Pioneer Village and Museum, & Evansville African-American Museum

*Post written by Mona Meyer, Archives and Special Collections Metadata Librarian.

ArchivesFest 2019

October 14-25, 2019:  UASC on the 3rd floor of the David L. Rice Library

Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

University Archives and Special Collections (UASC) is celebrating American Archives Month with its annual event, ArchivesFest. This year’s artifacts and historical documents are from the Evansville Museum, Historic New Harmony, the Working Men’s Institute, Newburgh Museum, Reitz Home, and other museums, and will be on display in UASC.  Stop by UASC anytime Monday-Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. to view these special treasures from across the Tri-State region.

Working Men’s Institute

407 Tavern Street, New Harmony, IN 47631

1. WMI Entrance

Front entrance of the Working Men’s Institute, n.d.

Established by philanthropist William Maclure in 1838, the Working Men’s Institute (WMI) set as its mission the dissemination of useful knowledge to those who work with their hands. After 170 years of continuous service, this goal is still at the heart of our mission. Maclure, who was a business partner with Robert Owen in the communal experiment in New Harmony from 1825-1827, was devoted to the ideal of education for the common man as a means of positive change in society. At New Harmony, The Working Men’s Institute was one manifestation of this ideal.  The Working Men’s Institute in New Harmony was the first of 144 WMIs in Indiana and 16 in Illinois. It is the only one remaining. Many WMIs were absorbed by township libraries or Carnegie libraries. Yet the one in New Harmony remained.  …  Today, the WMI is a public library, a museum and an archive. In each of these areas, the WMI tries to stay true to the original mission of William Maclure.

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Lincoln Pioneer Village and Museum

928 Fairground Drive, Rockport, IN 47635

Lincoln Pioneer Village and Museum, n.d.

Lincoln Pioneer Village and Museum, n.d.

Travel back through time and walk through cabins showing life as it was during Abe Lincoln’s early years. The Lincoln Pioneer Village is a historic memorial to Lincoln that visualizes the Spencer County environment in which Lincoln lived during the 14 formative years of his life, from 1816 to 1830.  Walk through cabins depicting life 200 years ago as Lincoln would have lived it. Visit the museum on the grounds with displays of military artifacts, clothing, utensils, spinning wheels and a rare rocker beater loom still in use today. See the hutch handmade by Abraham Lincoln with the help of his father, Thomas.

Commemorative Lincoln penny, magnet, log cabin bank, brochure, top hat, pioneer bonnet, and Lincoln bobble-head, n.c.

Commemorative Lincoln memorabilia, n.d.

Evansville African-American Museum

579 South Garvin Street, Evansville, IN 47713

Entrance to the Evansville African-American Museum, n.d.

Entrance to the Evansville African-American Museum, n.d.

The mission of the Evansville African American Museum is to continually develop a resource and cultural center to collect, preserve, and educate the public on the history and traditions of African American families, organizations, and communities.  Located in Evansville, Indiana as the last remaining building of Lincoln Gardens, the second Federal Housing Project created under the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal in 1938, our building serves as a permanent artifact in itself.

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ArchivesFest Spotlight: Reitz Home & Willard Library

*Post written by Mona Meyer, Archives and Special Collections Metadata Librarian.

ArchivesFest 2019

October 14-25, 2019:  UASC on the 3rd floor of the David L. Rice Library

Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

University Archives and Special Collections (UASC) is celebrating American Archives Month with its annual event, ArchivesFest. This year’s artifacts and historical documents are from the Evansville Museum, Historic New Harmony, the Working Men’s Institute, Newburgh Museum, Reitz Home, and other museums, and will be on display in UASC.  Stop by UASC anytime Monday-Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. to view these special treasures from across the Tri-State region.

Reitz Home

112 Chestnut Street, Evansville, IN 47713

1. Reitz Home Entrance

Front entrance of the Reitz Home, n.d.

This 1871 home was built by John Augustus Reitz who was born in Prussia, moved to the United States in the 1830’s, and made his fortune in lumber. “Today, the Reitz Home is noted as one of the country’s finest examples of Second Empire architecture. Authentic period furniture, much of it original, is arranged as if the family is about to return. Silk damask-covered walls soar to decorative hand-painted ceilings and delicately molded plaster friezes. French gilt chandeliers shine down on one of the home’s most beautiful features: the intricately patterned hand-laid wood parquet floors. The home has tile and marble fireplaces, walnut wainscoting in Moorish design, and glowing stained glass window panels.”  It has been open as a museum since 1974.

The two images below is the St. Mary’s Conservatory medal awarded to Laura G. Fendrich in June 1884.

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Willard Library

21 First Avenue, Evansville, IN 47710

Front side of Willard Library, n.d.

Front side of Willard Library, n.d.

Willard Carpenter was born in Vermont in 1803 and came to Evansville in 1837 to continue to pursue his fortune.  Desirous of leaving a lasting legacy, in 1876 he expressed his intention “to establish and endow a PUBLIC LIBRARY, to be located in a public park, on land owned by me, situated in the city of Evansville. I am induced to do this in the well-grounded hope that such an institution may become useful toward the improvement of the moral and intellectual culture of the inhabitants of Evansville, and collaterally to those of the State of Indiana; and also toward the enlargement and diffusion of a taste for the fine arts.” The library opened in 1885, two years after Carpenter’s death.

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ArchivesFest Spotlight: LST 325 Ship & Evansville Wartime Museum

*Post written by Mona Meyer, Archives and Special Collections Metadata Librarian.

ArchivesFest 2019

October 14-25, 2019:  UASC on the 3rd floor of the David L. Rice Library

Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

University Archives and Special Collections (UASC) is celebrating American Archives Month with its annual event, ArchivesFest. This year’s artifacts and historical documents are from the Evansville Museum, Historic New Harmony, the Working Men’s Institute, Newburgh Museum, Reitz Home, and other museums, and will be on display in UASC.  Stop by UASC anytime Monday-Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. to view these special treasures from across the Tri-State region.

USS LST Ship Memorial

840 LST Drive, Evansville, IN 47713

1. LST Ship

LST 325 Memorial Ship on the Ohio River, n.d.

This LST (Landing Ship, Tank) is an amphibious vessel designed to land battle-ready tanks, troops and supplies directly onto enemy shores. Ships of this type proved to be enormously useful during times of war and peace both. This particular LST was originally known as LST-325 during the Second World War, USNS LST-325 during its arctic operations in the 1950’s, and later L-144 (A/G Syros) while it was in the service of the Greek Navy. It was acquired by The USS LST Ship Memorial, Inc., in 2000, and caught considerable public attention when our veteran crew brought it on a 6,500-mile journey from the Greek island of Crete to Mobile, Alabama. … October 3, 2005 opened a new and bright chapter in the saga of LST 325, when the ship arrived at its new homeport in Evansville, Indiana.”  This is the only World War II LST still in operation in U.S. waters. Its location here celebrates the fact that during World War II, the Evansville Shipyard built more LST’s than any other inland shipyard. This LST was NOT built here, but it represents those that were and the efforts of both builders and sailors.

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Evansville Wartime Museum

7503 Petersburg Road, Evansville, IN 47725

Logo of the Evansville Wartime Museum, n.d.

Logo of the Evansville Wartime Museum, n.d.

During WWII, our nation’s military went into battle with airplanes, ships, tanks and munitions manufactured in Evansville, IN. The museum is dedicated to showing and celebrating the stories of those who were there along with the memorabilia they collect.

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ArchivesFest Spotlight: Evansville Museum & Newburgh Museum

*Post written by Mona Meyer, Archives and Special Collections Metadata Librarian.

ArchivesFest 2019

October 14-25, 2019:  UASC on the 3rd floor of the David L. Rice Library

Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

University Archives and Special Collections (UASC) is celebrating American Archives Month with its annual event, ArchivesFest. This year’s artifacts and historical documents are from the Evansville Museum, Historic New Harmony, the Working Men’s Institute, Newburgh Museum, Reitz Home, and other museums, and will be on display in UASC.  Stop by UASC anytime Monday-Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. to view these special treasures from across the Tri-State region.

Evansville Museum of Arts, History, & Science

411 SE Riverside Drive, Evansville, IN 47713

Logo of the Evansville Museum of Arts, History, and Science, n.d.

Logo of the Evansville Museum of Arts, History, and Science, n.d.

Evansville has had a museum since 1906, with today’s location dating to the 1950’s.  This appearance dates to a major update and remodel circa 2014. “The Evansville Museum of Arts, History & Science houses a permanent collection of more than 30,000 objects, including fine and decorative art, as well as historic, anthropological, and natural history artifacts. Over twenty temporary, regional and international exhibitions are displayed each year in four galleries. The Koch Immersive Theater houses a 40-foot diameter domed screen with 360-degree digital projection featuring astronomy and science programming. Evansville Museum Transportation Center (EMTRAC) featuring transportation artifacts from the late 19th through the mid-20th centuries. On exhibit is a three-car train. The museum is home to a model train diorama of Evansville.

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Newburgh Museum

2 West Main Street, Newburgh, IN, 47630

1. Newburgh Museum Entrance

Newburgh Museum, n.d.

The Newburgh Museum’s mission is to preserve, exhibit and educate all visitors about the history and culture of Newburgh and the surrounding area’s unique river town heritage.  Located on the first floor of the Old Newburgh Presbyterian Church, the museum opened in July 2012.  The permanent displays at the museum include information about the town’s founding, how it got its name, its early industry, a period of decline and how it has changed in modern times. The main exhibit at the museum is changed every few months.

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ArchivesFest Spotlight: Angel Mounds & Historic New Harmony

*Post written by Mona Meyer, Archives and Special Collections Metadata Librarian.

ArchivesFest 2019

October 14-25, 2019:  UASC on the 3rd floor of the David L. Rice Library

Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

University Archives and Special Collections (UASC) is celebrating American Archives Month with its annual event, ArchivesFest. This year’s artifacts and historical documents are from the Evansville Museum, Historic New Harmony, the Working Men’s Institute, Newburgh Museum, Reitz Home, and other museums, and will be on display in UASC.  Stop by UASC anytime Monday-Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. to view these special treasures from across the Tri-State region.

Angel Mounds State Historical Site

8215 Pollack Avenue, Evansville, IN 47715

1. Angel Mounds Entrance

Entrance of Angel Mounds State Historical Site.

Located on the banks of the Ohio River in southwest Indiana, Angel Mounds State Historic Site is one of the best-preserved, pre-contact Native American sites in North America. Built between A.D. 1000 and 1450, the town was occupied by more than 1,000 people part of the Mississippian culture. The society built 11 earthen mounds as platforms to elevate important buildings. The original town covered an area of 103 acres and served as an important religious, political and trade center for people living within a 75-mile radius.  The site was abandoned before European explorers came to North America. Possible explanations for abandonment are depletion of natural resources, climatic changes or the collapse of chiefdom.  More than 600 acres comprise Angel Mounds State Historic Site, which includes an interpretive center, recreations of Mississippian buildings and a working reconstruction of the 1939 WPA archaeology laboratory. The 500-acre non-archaeological portion of the site contains a nature preserve with hiking and biking trails.

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Historic New Harmony

401 N. Arthur Street, New Harmony, IN 47631

1. HNH Logo

Historic New Harmony Logo, n.d.

New Harmony was the source of two communal experiments in the 19th century: religious separatists from Germany who aspired to Christian perfection, and later, followers of Robert Owen who wanted to establish a model society of educational and social equality.  “Historic New Harmony is a unified program of the University of Southern Indiana and the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites. By preserving its utopian legacy, Historic New Harmony inspires innovation and progressive thought through its programs & collections.

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